A Tale of Two Towns, Muang La and Muang Khua

MuangLaKhua - 15

Dancing in the Street, Muang Khua

After our energetic two days trekking and rafting we hobble downstairs to catch a songthaew to the bus station so we can continue our journey through Northern Laos. Our small bus is nearly full of local people but we find some space and are soon on our way. We start with a 3 1⁄2 hour journey to Oudomxai, also spelt Oudomxay or Udomxai and also referred to as Muang Xai. No wonder we keep getting confused when we looked at maps. We’re not in the protected area any more but we have great views as we travel along the ridge tops descending into valleys now and then to cross a river or stream then climbing back up to another ridge. As before tiny villages and small towns make use of any available flat land and some agriculture extends around the village and along creek sides but much of the country is too steep and difficult to access so lots of forest remains in this region.

Oudomxai is a major interchange bus station and a busy city and we are just in time to catch a minivan for the one hour trip north to the village of Muang La. This time we’re joined by two other westerners who are travelling further than we are and the mini van is packed full. We’re stopping in Muang La because we read of a pleasant guest house, some hot springs for soaking in and we’ve seen lovely photos of the area around the Nam Pak River. We aren’t actually sure what we’ll find however as recent reviews suggest the situation has changed. That proves right; the guest house by the river is closed for renovations following flooding and the springs are not available to the public any more as they seem to have been closed off by a new exclusive, and very expensive, resort.

We find a guest house easily enough but finding a place to get a late lunch proves more difficult. A nearby place is sign-posted as a restaurant but the roller shutter doors are firmly closed and we can’t find anyone who speaks English to ask for information about the restaurant or where else we can get a meal. I knew we should have made more effort to learn Lao but suspect even if we did we would still struggle in a place like this. The centre of town is about a kilometre away and we figure if we don’t find a restaurant along the way we should get something there so we head in that direction. There is a small market including a couple of stalls selling cooked meat and a few other things but just before it are three noodle shops and we pick one and are very happy with the flavors and freshness. In fact it is so nice we return to the same place for our evening meal, the menu might be limited, to only one choice, but the food is good.

By now it’s mid afternoon and hot so we take a back road to the guest house for a rest until it cools. On our way to dinner we meander down a back road taking in the views along the way. When we return via the main road we find the restaurant which had been shut earlier is now open and a couple from Germany are finishing their meal. They rented a motor cycle in Oudomxai so they have more freedom to explore the countryside and are staying the night in the same guest house we are.

Paul is up early, again, for misty photos, they sure make the place look good. He also visits Wat Pha Singkham, the local temple on a hill overlooking the town. Later we have our breakfast in the nearby restaurant and, as there is no regular bus stop in town, the helpful owner writes a sign to alert the driver of the bus we want to catch. He turns up right on time, and has room for us so we are soon on our way to Muang Khua arriving there in the middle of the day.

Muang La, “Please stop to pick up two farang bound for Muang Khua” or words to that effect

Muang Khua is the last town I visited on my previous trip to Laos, five years ago, and is the kick off point for our trip down the Nam Ou (Ou River) which we have been looking forward to. It’s an interesting town in its own right though with a busy market, lots of photogenic old buildings and interesting laneways and paths to wander down. It’s built at the junction of the Nam Ou and the Nam Pak rivers. Travellers passing through either travel up or down the Nam Ou or along the road between Oudomxai and the north west corner of Vietnam. It’s well set up to cater for backpackers and we soon find a comfortable guest house and explore the town.

There aren’t a huge number of restaurants but we enjoy our meals, particularly a dish of stir-fried mushrooms which is packed with fresh shiitake mushrooms plus other varieties as well. In between meals we wander through the town taking in the sights, and taking more photos.

Morning photos include the early morning alms giving, school children and workers heading off for their day and boats on the misty river. After breakfast we line up by the Nam Ou river with other backpackers ready for our boat trip down to Muang Ngoy.

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