Heading North in Mozambique

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Sunrise at Morrungulo on the Mozambique Coast

Border crossings from South Africa to Mozambique have a reputation for being slow and possibly with problems of corruption or at least pestering. I’m happy to say the Giryondo Border Post in the centre of Kruger and the Limpopo National Parks offered a friendly and efficient service and we were through the South African and Mozambique offices of Immigration, Customs and National Parks in just over 40 minutes. That included obtaining our Mozambique visa on arrival and saw us head into Mozambique by mid morning. Our visa is valid for 30 days and we plan to use all or most of that time in our travels from here to the Tanzanian border in the far north of the country.

We are heading for the coast and the first section of the road through the Limpopo park is slow going rocky with plenty of corrugations. We take it slowly and the car has seen much worse roads in the past so I am surprised when I glance in the side mirror to see one of our spare wheels bounding off into the bushes behind us. The weld on the rear tyre carrier completely failed and it is just as well I saw it go as the wheel which took off into the bush is carrying our rear number plate. It would be a nuisance and some expense to replace the wheel and carrier but it would be an administrative pain to try to get a new number plate. We retrieve the tyre from the bush, remove it from the broken piece of the carrier and strap it on top of the storage box on the roof rack. It will be a relatively easy job to get the weld repaired as we travel.

The rest of our journey to the coast is uneventful and the bitumen road, when we reach it, is in far better condition than we expected. That was until we reached the larger sections where the road replacement is under way and for many kilometres we travel along a dirt track a short distance off to the side of the road. This slows our average pace and as we have travelled further east with no change in time zone the sun is setting earlier so it is well and truly dark by the time we reach our camp site at the Sunset Beach Lodge and it is an easy decision to eat in the restaurant. The meal is good and cheap and when Paul spies crayfish on the menu at an extremely good price we decide to stay an extra night so we can enjoy a feast on the balcony for lunch the next day and a walk on the beach.

The stop over for an extra day means we are travelling north on a Monday so we are able to have the tyre carrier re-welded and to stock up on our food as we travel. Supermarkets become few and far between as you travel north in Mozambique so we can’t miss out on any opportunity to restock.

On our last trip to Mozambique we enjoyed an extended stay at Morrungulo Beach Lodge and we are returning this trip. James and Barbara and their son Harry have a beautifully maintained camping and chalet area on a glorious beach and, although we hadn’t planned to stay too long, we end up staying for a week. We set up the ground tent for the first time, relieved that it is very simple as we had managed to lose the instructions, and Paul is able to spend time working on his photos. Of course he also takes some more great photos from the beach and the drone while we are there.

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Morrungulo Beach at Sunset

We swim twice every day, walk for kilometres along the beach on the firm sands, enjoy the lush green campgrounds and generally relax while we work on our photos and writing. Local fishermen offer their catches and we feast on crayfish one night and buy a huge barracuda which is filleted and feeds us for another two nights and also leaves us with enough fish for another five nights. Yum. Its a hard place to leave but we really need to pick up our travels again. To my surprise the tent easily fits back inside its bag.

Our next significant destination is Ilha da Mocambique (Mozambique Island) which is more than 1,700 km and thousands of potholes north. We met Tessie, Anton and Carol while we were at Sunset Beach Lodge and they were headed for their place at Inhassaro and invited us to stay. Inhassaro is 20 km off the main highway but we decide to drop in as it would be good to see them again. We have lost their phone number so don’t even give them advance warning but they make us very welcome at their place, Yellowfin Lodge, and give us a room for the night and we join them for a delicious dinner and a good yarn.

We are travelling on EN1 (Highway One) and hit some bad potholes as soon as we had travelled north of Vilanculos before we reached Inhassaro. As we continue north they get worse. We try various ways to describe them: you don’t drive over these potholes, you enter them then some time later come out; even the potholes have potholes; sometimes the potholes on the side of the road are so bad you go back to the original potholes in the middle of the road; and then sometimes the road condition was so bad it was no longer potholes, just holes with virtually no bitumen left.

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Not much of the road left, EN1, Highway 1 in Mozambique

Our next overnight stop is at a camp near the Gorongosa National Park. The camp is about 15 km off the main road and it is delight to hit the relatively smooth gravel road. We reach the turn off into the camp, pass an abandoned building and head deeper into the bush. The campsite is run by the local community with payment by donation and is set amongst the bush. A couple and their young child had arrived just before us and were the only other campers for the night. We have a relatively short drive planned for the next day so it was lovely to wake in the bush and to have a relaxed start to the day.

James and Barbara recommended M’Phwinge Lodge for an overnight stay and although they have no camping sites they have very reasonably priced chalets. We have been in touch with the owners and Pat has given us directions for a dirt road around the top of the Gorongosa National Park so we can miss the worst section of the main road. It is a delightful drive and worth doing even if it didn’t have the added bonus of missing that dreadful stretch of road. The scenery is great, especially as we drive past the southern side of the Gorongosa massif and through villages filled with brightly dressed local people. There are a couple of river crossings which make this route impassable in the wet season but they are no problem now. Unfortunately some of the buses and trucks are also taking this route and the road is barely wide enough so we just try to get right out of their way as soon as we see them coming.

Eventually we reach the other end of the dirt road and turn on to Highway 2 (EN2), which instead of being potholed bitumen is sand. A few sections are fairly soft sand but most is packed down and, while we need to take care, it is much easier to cope with than potholes. We pass through the town of Inhaminga with ruins of Portuguese buildings along the main road and down side streets and lots of people near some market stalls. The sandy road continues right up until we reach the EN1, thankfully past the pot holed section, and just a few kilometres along we turn into M’Phingwe Lodge.

We have a comfortable night and a nice meal at M’Phwinge and chat with Pat and Ant White. The lodge is set amongst trees and a tame Blue Duiker wanders around the grounds. They are very rare and endemic to this area. He had been rescued and raised in a pen until he was led enough to fend for himself and was just released very recently. He hasn’t left for the bush yet and still likes being rubbed between the tiny horns but when he is ready he can leave and go back to the bush.

In the morning we have another 20 km of pot-holes to negotiate but Pat assures us the road is much better after that. We have more than 700 km to travel today so we leave very early and as we cross the Zambezi the mist is rising through the early sunshine. The river is huge here, many times bigger then when we crossed it first in western Zambia then again as we crossed it as we left Zambia for Zimbabwe and finally as it thundered over the Victoria Falls. Many rivers feed into it and they have all carried water from the rainy season.

The road is excellent and we make good progress. An unusual sight is a poor goat tied to the top of a large truck, even while cornering the goat managed to stay on its feet. The land around here is dotted with huge granite outcrops called Inselbergs and we start seeing them about an hour before we reach our destination of Nampula.

The camp is 15km outside of the busy town and we arrive before dark. The camping area  is set in a manicured garden next to a lake at the base of an Inselberg. Its a very unusual setting and we compare it to our other camps since we arrived in Mozambique; on top of sand dunes at Sunset Beach, under trees just behind the beach at Morrungulo, in a lovely private lodge at Inhassaro, in the jungle at Gorongosa, and in the bush at M’Phingwe.

It was a full moon a few nights ago and there is still lots of light in the middle of the nights so Paul is up taking photographs for a couple of hours in the middle of the night and then again at first light. Luckily we have only a few hours driving to reach our destination for the next five nights, Ilha de Mocambique.

 

Kgalagadi Trans-frontier Park

 

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A Field of Springbok

When we visited Botswana last year it was towards the end of the dry season and the weather was getting very hot. Too hot, we decided, to visit the desert areas of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve and the Kgalagadi Trans-frontier Park. We promised ourselves we would return to travel in those areas when there had been some rain and the temperatures would be more comfortable.

After we flew back into South Africa in early March it took us two busy weeks in Johannesburg to finalise all the changes we wanted to the fitout on our vehicle and to spend time with Paul’s mother, sister and other family members.

Because we had sold the trailer we needed to make numerous changes to the fitout of the Toyota so we had more fridge, fuel and water capacity and space to fit in all the things we would need to carry to make our lives comfortable and safe for the next two plus years, including of course all Paul’s camera and computer gear. We also wanted a new roof top tent which was more comfortable, easier to set up, and had more air and light as well as a new awning to provide better shelter. While we were out of the country Gary had completed lots of work re-fitting out the interior of the land cruiser. He had installed our new fridge where the back seat had been and made a great shelving system next to and in front of it so Paul could securely stow all his camera and computer gear and still be able to easily access it all. A new water tank and gas bottle carrier had been ordered and our new roof top tent and awning was due to be installed a couple of days after we arrived. The roof rack had been modified to allow them to fit and Jerry cans and our storage box for awnings and mats were in place. Other handy features Gary had designed and built were tables which could be clipped on to both sides of the rear of the truck or on top of the drawers at the back and a wash basin support which fitted on to a rear spare wheel.

We were very happy with all the high quality work he had completed and after living with it on the road for a month we are even happier with it all. Thank you Gary.

Paul would still need somewhere to set up his iMac to process his photos so we bought a ground tent we could set up when we were staying put for a little longer.

By the time we had had the roof top tent, awning, water tank and gas bottle carrier fitted, had the car serviced, found and bought a list of items we needed, stocked up our provisions, caught up with some people we had met on our last visit and installed the solar panels we were just about out of time and Paul struggled to find time to reorganize his photographic files and process a few to share while I juggled everything to make it all fit in the car.

It was time to get back into the bush and we headed west out of Johannesburg in the pouring rain two weeks after we landed in South Africa. By mid afternoon the next day the weather was hot and sunny and we were checking into our campsite at Twee Rivieren at the South African entrance to the Kgalagadi Park.

All together we spent six nights in the park, two at Twee Rivieren and two at Nossob in the South African section and one each at Polentswa and Swartpan in the Botswana section. We also had one night just north of the Kaa gate in Botswana. We took drives each morning and afternoon so we had a good chance to explore quite a lot of the area.

Beautiful Gemsbok, also called Oryx, were abundant showing why the South African section used to be called the Gemsbok National Park. Springbok were the other very abundant type of antelope and we also saw wildebeest, hartebeest, impala, and bush duikers.

Other animals we saw included zebra, black backed jackals, a bat eared fox and lots of ostriches. I finally saw some meerkats and loved watching them standing upright and peering all around before scurrying back to their holes. We also saw lots of social weaver nests, they are quite a feature of the park. We had a distant sighting of a cheetah but hardly enough to pick out its markings as it rested in the shade of a tree several hundred metres from the track.

Even though we didn’t see any of the lions which are one of the main draw cards of the Botswana section of the park we enjoyed the rugged bush scenery and and the general feeling of isolation.

When we left the park we drove just a short distance from the gate to the Kaa pan where herds of springbok, Oryx, Eland and Wildebeest grazed on the short grass covering most of the area. We decided it would be a good place to make a bush camp and have a good view of the full moon a well as a good chance of seeing more wild life in the morning. We selected a spot well clear of any trees or bushes so we had a good field of vision and settled down to enjoy the views.

About 2.00 am we woke to the cough of a lion. Instantly wide awake we peered out of the windows and, under the light of the full moon, we could make out a distant movement. As we watched we saw more movements and eventually we had a pride of at least seven lions, including two large males, circling our vehicle. The nearest was a curious female who approached within 50 metres. We felt quite safe in our hard topped roof top tent, well pretty safe anyway, but we certainly weren’t venturing out of it to get a camera to record the amazing experience.

The show continued for an hour or so but finally they lost interest in us and faded away into the night. In the morning there was no trace they had been there, with just a few springbok grazing as the mist lifted. The drive out to the main road continued for the next couple of hours through this buffer zone surrounding the park but eventually our sightings of springbok and other wild game gave way to sightings of cattle and goats, and, as we began passing people and villages the road turned to bitumen and this part of our Botswana adventure ended. Onward to the next!

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Springbok grazing as the mist rises at Kaa Pan

Bamboo Nest de Chiang Rai

Another Bamboo Nest Chalet

While we were passing through the hills north of Chiang Rai on our boat ride south from Tha Ton we enjoyed the scenery so much that we started looking for a quiet place to stay for a while before we cross the border into Laos. We found a small place in the hills that looked just the job. We couldn’t find out much about it on the Internet but the few reviews we found were all very positive. I phoned and left a message and it wasn’t long before Nok phoned me back and we were booked in. Nok told us where and when to meet her at the ‘old bus station’.

So here we are, mango smoothy in hand, waiting for Nok at 4pm at Bay No. 1 at the bus station. She arrives just after four but we have to wait a while for everyone else to arrive. There are seven of us plus Nok to fit into and onto a dual cab Ute. Three of us try and fit into the back with all the luggage but it is quickly apparent that this won’t work, especially as we expect some of the roads we will be travelling on to be fairly rough. After we voice our concerns Nok trots off and organises a songthaew for us and we get underway. After a while we are driving alongside the Kok River and we start recognising places that we passed in the boat a few days ago.

Travelling with us in the songthaew is Michael from Toronto, Canada. After a few stops for Nok to buy some supplies we cross the Kok River and drive past the national park headquarters and the hot springs which we visited on our way down the river. Then we start heading up into the hills which get steeper and steeper. The songthaew struggles to reach a small village where the driver announces that he can’t go any further and we have to walk the last 500 metres. We climb out and quickly see why. The last section up to the Bamboo Nest requires low range in a four wheel drive and it sure has us puffing! The country is fantastic and we stop to enjoy the view and catch our breath at the same time. Our bags travel in style in the back of the Ute.

We are quickly checked in and briefed on the honour system for drinks and snacks and the serving hours for breakfast and dinner. We take a short stroll down to our bamboo chalet and check it out. Wonderful! A verandah with a bench and a hammock and we can lie on the bed and catch part of the view across to the mountain rice paddies and the green hills beyond. Almost all of the chalet is constructed out of bamboo including the hammock. The floor of the bathroom is concrete and the roof is thatched with palm tree leaves, but that’s about it. A mosquito net hangs over the huge bed and there is a low bench where we place our backpacks. Two bamboo-shuttered windows frame views of the hills and the banana plants. Otherwise the room is free of clutter.

At dinner we meet Michael’s wife Tracey as well as Margrit from Holland, Sue from England, and Luc from Belgium. We are all of a similar age and it is fun catching up on everyones travel stories. Luc has been traveling extensively for several decades and has visited many countries in every continent. Sue and Margrit both lived in Kenya for a while and that’s where they first met. We enjoy chatting about the places we all know there. We also enjoy the small fireworks display from the village below where they are celebrating Chinese New Year.

The next day we decide to relax and catch up on our reading plus some writing for the blog. We have brought our coffee plunger and a supply of ground coffee and there is plenty of hot water available so we are set. Luc visits the village and the rest of the mob walk up to the waterfall. It is so peaceful sitting on the verandah and we manage to get quite a bit done. After a while Luc gets back from the village where he has been plied with Beer Lao and offered two women as prospective wives. He soon trots off to his chalet to sleep it off. We enjoy a light lunch and the others get back a little later. During the afternoon we have a brief nap down in our chalet. We leave the doors and windows open to let the breeze waft through.

In the early evening we stroll back up to the dining area. After the hustle and bustle of Chiang Rai the contrast of this sleepy hill village with its far flung vistas is a wonderful change of pace. We stand on the patio which looks out over the chalets to the rice paddies in the valley and the hills beyond and breath deeply. The gardens are rich with tropical flowers, banana plants and there is a fireplace on a bamboo platform off to one side.

That evening another couple, Bill and Paula, arrive after traveling cross country from Chiang Mai. They are from England and Paula is another amateur photographer so we have a couple of sessions chatting about photography.

The days begin to blur into each other. We spend time reading and writing with afternoon naps when we feel like it.  I am up early in the morning taking photos of the mist-filled valleys. We get some exercise walking back down to the village in the morning and in the evening to take photographs. We are greeted as we pass through the village and the kids often stop to look at my beard. The odd firecracker goes off but otherwise it is pretty quiet.

We are having such a relaxed time we decide to stay a fourth night and our decision comes with an added bonus. In the evening we are treated to a demonstration of how to cook sticky rice in bamboo. Lengths of green bamboo are cut just below one joint and then a couple of feet above to create a long thin receptacle into which water and rice are placed. The open end is sealed with green leaves and then several such bamboo sticks are stood in the burning fire. The bamboo doesn’t burn because it is so green but the rice inside cooks pretty quickly.

Once the rice is cooked the tough outer layer of the bamboo sticks is removed with a sharp knife so that the remaining bamboo can be easily split and peeled back to reveal the sticky rice. It tastes great and there is plenty of other food to go with it.

We could so easily stay a little longer but we both know that we have some other great places to visit in Laos which is where we are headed next.

Follow us on a map

We recently started using a different satellite communications device which also lets us log our travels on a map which we can share with you.

If you would like to follow our travels on a map then click here to go to the map page on our web site. We log our travels when we are driving and update the map when we have an Internet connection. You can visit the site anytime to see where we are and where we have been.

The photos we post on our blog will lag behind our actual location but we eventually catch up … Enjoy!

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